Leave a comment telling us a compelling story of a maker you know, what they make so well and why you love it, and we’ll pick a comment at random and send you our copy of Brooklyn Makers!

Brooklyn Makers

brooklyn makers

Fortmakers of Brooklyn. Photo courtesy of Jennifer Causey

Brooklyn Makers is a 170 page softcover book put out by Princeton Architectural Press featuring the work of our friend Jennifer Causey, a seriously adroit photographer and compelling writer, whose inspiration comes largely from makers who have figured out a way to live happier, simpler, more self-sufficient lives.

Jen says, in the book’s foreword,  that she’s been inspired by makers her whole life, growing up around her mother and grandmother who were seamstresses, and her somewhat nostalgic connection to the tactile movement shows up in her imagery, which highlights the beauty of makers who are truly immersed in their work.

brooklyn makers

Haslegrave brothers of hOme. Photo courtesy of Jennifer Causey

brooklyn distillers

Kings County Distillery, Brooklyn, NY. Photo courtesy of Jennifer Causey

“Being allowed to peer through Jennifer’s perfectly framed window into the studios,” Eric Demby writes in the book’s intro, “romanticizes the creative process while bringing it down to a universal, human scale that makes you believe, “Hey, I could do this too.”

And it’s true. When you watch someone blow glass to make dishes, or cut, hand-sew and painstakingly polish a leather bag to perfection, it feels like special work. There’s a certain value attached to the product, and it’s human. It makes you proud to wear or own that item, and tell the story of how it came to be.

The book, featuring 30 of those stories, is available this month on Amazon, and we think the book’s publication is a really interesting opportunity to open the discussion around makers. With so many people starting to move back in the direction of the self-sufficient life, what are the standards for success? What does it mean to be a great maker? What does it take?

5 Comments

  1. Posted October 23, 2012 at 9:52 AM | Permalink

    Richard the Maker

    My uncle was a maker, fused with his ability to fix, dabble, carve, weld was just a natural ability to do so. He met his maker when I turned five. But I knew what he did. My favorite childhood toy was a hole and peg set he had hand carved from a piece of pecan wood. He probably didn’t know that would be his legend. But the great thing about hand made objects is that they last lifetimes, so it’ll be my sons toy and hopefully he too will realize how making something strong and honest will make your legend live on whatever it may be.

  2. Mary Beth Hunt
    Posted October 24, 2012 at 12:59 AM | Permalink

    My daughter makes simple but beautiful flowers out of wool felt, vintage buttons, and stitching. She turns these flowers into pins and wedding bouquets. princesslasertron.com

  3. Cass
    Posted November 1, 2012 at 12:19 PM | Permalink

    Thank you everyone for your lovely stories of makers you know. It was very hard to decide who should win a copy of the book, since the comments were equally interesting and inspiring. We decided to draw out of a hat and chose Nicholas, whose story was about the "strong and honest" work of his uncle. Nicholas, please email me your address at cass@kaufmann-mercantile.com

  4. Cass
    Posted November 1, 2012 at 12:19 PM | Permalink

    Thank you everyone for your lovely stories of makers you know. It was very hard to decide who should win a copy of the book, since the comments were equally interesting and inspiring. We decided to draw out of a hat and chose Nicholas, whose story was about the "strong and honest" work of his uncle. Nicholas, please email me your address at cass@kaufmann-mercantile.com

  5. Posted April 15, 2015 at 8:16 PM | Permalink

    Have you ever thought about publishing an e-book or guest authoring on other websites?
    I have a blog centered on the same ideas you discuss and would love to
    have you share some stories/information. I know my audience would value your work.
    If you are even remotely interested, feel free to send me an e-mail.

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared.

Click here to subscribe (via RSS) to the comments of this post.